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Lyndsay, The Titanic

The Titanic is an iconic movie that captured the hearts of people all over the world. It’s a go-to film for rainy days and date night, and manages to get me choked up every single time. The captivating love story grasps the attention of a large audience and the historically accurate details subtly inform. Its the perfect mix of fun and fact, which is what got me interested in history in the first place. James Cameron, the director of the flick, made sure to make it historically accurate to honour the event. This includes the number of lifeboats, the way it hit the iceberg, and the sense of panic on board. Without these critical plot points, the story would not be as intriguing. My obsession with the movie continues to grow with every watch, thanks to Leonardo Dicaprio’s beautiful face and the heart-pounding action. This movie is a must watch if you haven’t already seen it.

Romance drama is already one of the most popular movie genres, thanks to the large population of teenage girls, myself included. Even though the primary audience is women, I have never met a man that would willingly admit to disliking this movie for fear of being shunned. This cinema treasure dives into the beautiful, and tragically short love story of Jack and Rose, and their experience aboard the historic ship, the Titanic, that ultimately sinks when it hits an iceberg in the middle of the Atlantic. The film is packed with action which makes the movie appeal to a broader audience and does its job of making you feel as though you are living through the sinking of the ship. The amount of times you will catch yourself holding your breath to see if the passengers will make it into the lifeboats is shocking. What makes this movie truly special is the ability to portray a historical event accurately but still allow for room to have creative license and play with the characters.

The movie focuses on the love story between Jack and Rose. Even though these characters are fictional, James Cameron wanted to portray the film with as much accuracy as possible to honour the tragedy, while also appealing to a broader audience. The number of lifeboats and collapsible’s was the same as the actual event, which is a crucial detail to the story. It’s interesting to note that even though there were not enough lifeboats, the number was still up to British code at the time; A sad detail that somehow makes the event even more disheartening. The lack of boats sends a panic throughout the ship, which was portrayed accurately in the movie. 1500 passengers out of 2400 died, and this amount is respected in the film. An exciting film choice Cameron made was to show Victor Garber, the ship's director, in the first class smoking room staring at a painting while the boat was sinking. This room was the last place he was seen on the ship during the actual event, even if it wasn’t Rose and Jack that were the ones who saw him there. Cameron’s imitation of the dramatic crashing of the boat and iceberg was portrayed just as recorded, with the ship going 20 knots per hour when the lookout spotted the ice. The iceberg sideswipes the boat and tears through the lower half creating a large leak. Without these details portrayed in an accurate way, the characters in the movie may have not been as easy to empathize with because it would not have felt as real.

Historical fictions captivate a broad audience and manage to ring in millions of dollars in the box office yearly. The Titanic is considered one of the best movies of all time and for a good reason. I watched the Titanic for the first time with my high school boyfriend.He was more interested in talking with me the whole movie than actually watching it. I remember having to shush him because I was instantly sucked into the dramatic love story and tear-jerking action. I shamelessly will admit that I may have been more interested in young Leo than my boyfriend at the time, but who isn’t? Who can forget the iconic scene with Rose leaning forward on the front of the ship with Jack’s arms tied around her waist, Celine Dion blasting in the background; “I’m flying Jack,” will be quoted for centuries to come. Leonardo DiCaprio portrays Jack in the most mysterious way that makes you never want to look away for fear you will miss the chance to stare at his face. I don’t think I had ever cried as hard as when Rose had to pry a frozen Jack off of her hand. However, I may be a little salty with Kate Winslet’s character because I genuinely believe that Jack could have fit on the door. Rose’s engagement in the movie adds a dark twist to her character development. Her fiancé Cal manipulates her and mentally and physically abuses her. This dark side of the wealthy lifestyle and the reliability of the films well known bad guy makes it even more relatable and appealing. Thanks to Cal, the juxtaposition of the love in Jack’s eyes when he stares at Rose makes it much easier to root for team #Jose. With an outstanding soundtrack and intriguing narrative to back up the already fantastic film, it is an experience you cannot miss.

When creating a movie about a tragedy, it can be challenging to capture the event without exploiting it. Cameron’s film is sensitive and touching, and by keeping the incident historically accurate, it pays homage to the event in a beautiful way. The addition of engaging characters makes the movie all the more worthwhile. Jack’s minimalist attitude and inspiring speech at the dinner table with Rose’s family about making life count inspire me to remember that money is not the answer and we must take full advantage of the life we are given. Rose’s loyalty and strong-willed character is not only a kickass feminist, but shows that despite your gender, you are in charge of your life and can make your own decisions. Their love for one another gave my tween self the image of what true love can be like, and inspires me to look for it and never settle for less than what I believe true love to be. Cameron connects us to history in his unique way that inspires and humbles us.

This movie will forever be one of my all time favourites and I cannot recommend it enough. It captures a moment in time perfectly, without exploitation. By including a heart breaking love story in an already traumatic historical event, we are able to empathize and understand the event in a much more real way. The historical events and the unforgettable chemistry between the characters is an experience, and I envy you if you are just getting to watch this movie for the first time. Cameron does a remarkable job at bringing this event to life with his directing and script choices. DiCaprio and Winslet deliver captivating performances that will hold a place in your heart. I recommend watching this movie on the biggest screen you can find, it will charm you, entertain you, and touch your heart.

Bibliography

Titanic. DVD. Directed by James Cameron. 1997. London.

"Titanic Facts and Fiction: Exploring The Historical Accuracy Of The Movie Titanic." 30 James Street. July 24, 2017. Accessed April 15, 2018. https://rmstitanichotel.co.uk/titanic-facts-and-fiction-exploring-the-historical-accuracy-of-the-movie-titanic/.

Wilson, Andrew. "Why the Titanic Still Fascinates Us." Smithsonian.com. March 01, 2012. Accessed April 15, 2018. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/why-the-titanic-still-fascinates-us-98137822/.

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